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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jim Bitterman
Senior International correspondent
CNNW 10/21/2013
Bitterman: what bothers them most about the
Gwen Ifill
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor, PBS NewsHour
KQED 10/21/2013
Ifill: The French government called on the American Ambassador today to explain the latest revelation involving the U.S. National Security Agency. The French newspaper
Pedro Echevarria
Host C-SPAN
CSPAN 10/22/2013
Echevarria: (Alissa Rubin out of ) Paris for "the New York Times" saying that it was an article on Monday in Le Monde the French authoritative French newspaper said that the NSA had scooped up millions of digital communications inside France in a single month, from Dec. 10, 2012 to January 8, 2013. French officials called the spying “totally unacceptable” and demanded that it cease. “These kinds of practices between partners are totally unacceptable, and we must be assured that they are no longer being implemented.” And that, this according to a Ministry spokesman. The same language was used late Monday in a statement from President Francois Hollande (describing what he said in an earlier telephone conversation with President Obama). New York Times, Oct. 22, 2013
Justin Amash
U.S. Representative D-Michigan
CSPAN 10/26/2013
Amash: Thank God for Jim Sensenbrenner who spoke on the House Floor in favor of my amendment who’s now bringing a bill to the House floor, the USA Freedom Act, to undo much of the damage of the Patriot Act. So, this is something we’re going to be working on. It’s gonna be introduced very soon. We need you to speak up, stand up, to call your representatives. i can’t tell you how much of a difference it makes when you call people in Congress. It makes a huge difference. It makes a huge difference. When people hear that their constituents are calling them, it changes their minds. I can’t tell you how many times I have been on the House floor and members of Congress are just talking to each other about how many constituents called them about a particular issues. it does make a difference.
Justin Amash
U.S. Representative D-Michigan
KNTV 10/26/2013
Isikoff: hundreds marched on capitol hill today protesting nsa surveillance and cheering a fresh message from their hero in Moscow, fugitive ex-nsa contractor Edward Snowden. Pea party republican Congressman Justin Amash said Snowden opened America's eyes to what the NSA is doing. Isikoff: Are you grateful for what he's done? Amash: we wouldn't have the reforms for the NSA if not for what he did.
Michael Isikoff
NBC News, National Investigative Correspondent
KNTV 10/26/2013
Isikoff: The German magazine der spigel that has gotten access to some Snowden documents reported today the NSA had actually targeted German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cell phone since 2002 while she was still an opposition leader. This just days after President Obama was forced to personally apologize to Merkel over earlier disclosures of NSA snooping as well as a presidential pledge to Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto issikoffto investigate reports the NSA hacked into his computer.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: everyone at this table is also an American citizen, have agreed that we would take our personal data and put it into a pile, a lock box that would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign al Qaeda or related terrorist group and look into that box. In 2012 we had 288 such selectors that we could look into that. That's it. Of the billions of records only 288. With that we had tremendous oversight.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: everything we do on this program is audited 100% on the business record FISA, 100%. The data is kept separate from all the other data that we have. And I think it's important to understand that the leaker did not have access to this data, period.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: The technical safeguards that we have there insure that no one else gets access to it and that no one can get a query unless it goes to one of those 288 numbers and the numbers that are currently on the list. Only 22 people at NSA are authorized to provide numbers, to approve numbers and about 30 are authorized to look into that database and that's it.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Alexander: We’ve asked industries’ help. Ask, OK, more accurately we have compelled industry to help us in this manner by court order. And what they’re doing is saving lives and they are being penalized because they’re helping to save lives and our way of life so that people sitting behind me can express their feelings. That's something that we all stand up for so that they can say what they believe.
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